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Shrink VMDK Virtual Disk Size on VMWare ESXi - Do it Now ?


This article covers how to shrink VMDK Virtual Disk Size on VMWare ESXi.
By default, VMware creates "growable" disks that grow larger in size as you add data.

Unfortunately, they don't automatically shrink when you remove data.
You'll need to clean up or compact your disks to actually free up space on your hard drive.

VMware Workstation also allows you to create snapshots, which contain a complete "snapshot" of a virtual machine's state at the point in time you created them.
These can take a lot of space if the virtual machine has changed significantly since then.
You can free up additional space by deleting snapshots you no longer need.

1. To view the snapshots for a virtual machine, select the virtual machine in VMware Workstation and click VM > Snapshot > Snapshot Manager.
2. To delete a snapshot you no longer need, right-click it in the Snapshot Manager window and select "Delete". It will be removed from your computer.
3. You won't be able to restore your virtual machine to that previous point in time after deleting the snapshot, of course.

Before we try to shrink the virtual disk files, we should try to remove any unneeded files from the virtual machine to free space.

For example, on Debian-based VMs, you can run:

$ apt-get clean

To clear out the local repository of retrieved package files.
Next, run the command below to fill the unused space with zeros:

cat /dev/zero > zero.fill;sync;sleep 1;sync;rm -f zero.fill


Free Disk Space In VMware Workstation

In VMware Workstation, first power off the virtual machine you want to compact. You can't complete this process if it's powered on or suspended.
1. Select the virtual machine you want to compact in the main window and click VM > Manage > Clean Up Disks.
2. The tool will analyze the selected virtual machine's disk and show you how much space you can reclaim.
To reclaim the space, click "Clean up now".
If no space can be freed, you'll see a "Cleanup is not necessary" message here instead.

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Boot a guest using PXE - Do it now


This article covers how to boot a guest using PXE. PXE booting is supported for Guest Operating Systems that are listed in the VMware Guest Operating System Compatibility list and whose operating system vendor supports PXE booting of the operating system.

The virtual machine must meet the following requirements:

1. Have a virtual disk without operating system software and with enough free disk space to store the intended system software.

2. Have a network adapter connected to the network where the PXE server resides.


A virtual machine is not complete until you install the guest operating system and VMware Tools. Installing a guest operating system in your virtual machine is essentially the same as installing it in a physical computer.


To use PXE with Virtual Machines:

You can start a virtual machine from a network device and remotely install a guest operating system using a Preboot Execution Environment (PXE). 

You do not need the operating system installation media. When you turn on the virtual machine, the virtual machine detects the PXE server.


To Install a Guest Operating System from Media:

You can install a guest operating system from a CD-ROM or from an ISO image. Installing from an ISO image is typically faster and more convenient than a CD-ROM installation. 


To Upload ISO Image Installation Media for a Guest Operating System:

You can upload an ISO image file to a datastore from your local computer. You can do this when a virtual machine, host, or cluster does not have access to a datastore or to a shared datastore that has the guest operating system installation media that you require.


How to Use a private libvirt network ?

1. Boot a guest virtual machine using libvirt with PXE booting enabled. You can use the virt-install command to create/install a new virtual machine using PXE:

virt-install --pxe --network network=default --prompt

2. Alternatively, ensure that the guest network is configured to use your private libvirt network, and that the XML guest configuration file has a <boot dev='network'/> element inside the <os> element, as shown in the following example:

<os>

   <type arch='x86_64' machine='pc-i440fx-rhel7.0.0'>hvm</type>

   <boot dev='network'/>

   <boot dev='hd'/>

</os>

3. Also ensure that the guest virtual machine is connected to the private network:

<interface type='network'>

   <mac address='52:54:00:66:79:14'/>

   <source network='default'/>

   <target dev='vnet0'/>

   <alias name='net0'/>

   <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x03' function='0x0'/>

</interface>

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Selecting the number of vCPUs and Cores for a Virtual Machine


This articles will guide you when selecting the number of vCPUs and Cores for a Virtual Machine which depends on the operating system used and some other factors.

Basically, When Selecting the Number of #vCPUs and #Cores for a Virtual Machine, you can use all CPU #resources allocated to a virtual machine, it must see one 8 core #processor, 2 vCPUs with 4 cores each or 1 vCPU with 4 cores in two threads instead of 8 vCPUs.

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Install and Configure Free VMware Hypervisor


This article will guide you on the process to Configure Free VMware Hypervisor, to create a virtual #machine, and install a guest operating system.

“VMware vSphere Hypervisor #VMware #vSphere #Hypervisor is a free product that provides a simple and easy way to get started with #virtualization at no cost.

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Invalid State of a Virtual Machine on VMWare ESXi


This article will guide you on the steps to resolve the Invalid State of a Virtual Machine on VMWare #ESXi error which relates to #orphaned virtual machines.

A virtual machine can show up as invalid or orphaned in these situations. After a vMotion or #VMware DRS migration. After a VMware HA #host failure occurs, or after the #ESX host comes out of maintenance mode. A virtual machine is deleted outside of vCenter Server. #vCenter Server is restarted while a migration is in progress.

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